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Lagenda Restaurant

Holiday Villa Hotel London.+44(0)207-258-0269 
info@lagendarestaurant.co.uk
35-37 Leinster Gardens, London W2 3AN

 

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ABOUT US

At Lagenda we serve authentic Malaysian and Chinese cuisine. Favourites include satay, nasi lemak, chicken and fish curry, laksa, crispy tumeric marinated fried chicken, traditional nasi goreng (Malaysian spicy fried rice with vegetables, seafood and chicken, fried egg and satay) steamboat and other popular Chinese dishes. Guests can also enjoy sumptuous English fare and international delights. With a 100 seat capacity, the restaurant is also known for its cocktail bar and weekend buffet.

BREAKFAST

Begin your day at Lagenda with breakfast. Enjoy our popular continental breakfast buffet for just £7.90 per person or why not try the Full English or even our traditional Malaysian Breakfast, both include a hot drink £8.90

Breakfast is served from 7am until 10:30am.

ABOUT MALAYSIAN CUISINE

A popular dish based on rice in Malaysia is nasi lemak, rice steamed with coconut milk and pandan leaves to give it a rich fragrance. Of Malay origin, nasi lemak is frequently referred to as the national dish.It is customarily served with ikan bilis, peanuts, sliced cucumber, hard boiled eggs and sambal. Although it is often considered a breakfast dish, because of the versatility of nasi lemak in being able to be served in a variety of ways, it is commonly eaten at any time of the day. For a more substantial meal, nasi lemak may be served with fried chicken, curries, or a spicy meat stew called rendang.

Malaysians will proudly declare that they have the best satay, and that others have just been more successful at marketing it. (Thailand and Indonesia, to name two, might contest that.) But you’ll see satay all over the place in Malaysia, towering piles of skewers in hawker stalls that are tossed on the grill once you order. Penang food writer Helen Ong distinguishes Malaysian satay by its peanut-based “sweet and slightly piquant sauce” and the “meats marinated with local spices.”

There are endless variations of laksa, Malaysia’s beloved noodle soup, but there are two umbrella categories: asam laksa and curry laksa. The former, pictured here, has a tart tamarind-based broth and is generally cooked with a flaky white fish; noodles on the bottom, cucumber and pineapple and the bitter torch ginger flower to top. It’s a little different everywhere you get it: in Penang, pictured here, it’s often particularly tart and spicy; the city’s proximity to Thailand is reflected in their perchant for those flavours.

Stir-fried noodles, which take many forms. You’ll often see yellow noodles quickly wok’d up with soy, garlic, shallots, and chilies; along with them might be shrimp or chicken, beef or vegetables. It’s fantastic street food; many hawkers use roaring charcoal fires, and their smoky flavour really makes anything cooked over it.